Internal problems

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© Bob Denton 2014

Internal problems   1340 – 1341

Edward celebrated that year by styling himself as the King of France and while this had little direct impact it gave a rallying point for any disgruntled French nobles and provinces. Notably among these malcontents were the Flemings, with a deep-rooted trading tradition with England, the Montforts in Brittany and Charles of Navarre.

These internal issues meant that the fighting all took place within France and would keep Philip busy between English chevauchées or expeditions. These were fast-moving raids that set out to burn and loot so as to inflict economic damage and make his central government next to impossible, all in an effort to bring Philip to the negotiating table.

Not that Edward was without problems, his alliances were expensive and this led to general unrest in England. His practice of dragooning merchant vessels in to his navy without recompense to their owners also began a decline in trade and as a knock-on effect a reduction in shipbuilding which would eventually tell, as the French were rebuilding its navy.

His regency back in England became distraught as the national debt grew, Edward and his forces in Europe were equally angered by the lack of funds being sent to fund their exploits. Edward returned to England and fire and arrest members of his royal administration, to the fury of a number of churchmen who claimed the king had no right to arrest royal officers. A parliament in spring 1341 drew up a compromise where Edward was awarded a tax but only by conceding strictures on his funding and administrative powers.

Forward to Breton Succession – Back to Flanders
Back to 1789 and all that!
© Bob Denton 2014